Orange, nicknamed the City of Princes, with its resolutely Provencal charm, invites you to take a stroll through time. The Théâtre Antique and the Arc de Triomphe, both protected historic monuments and UNESCO World Heritage Sites, are in a remarkable state of preservation, making them one of Provence's must-see attractions.
Visitors are amazed by the city's rich history, dating back two thousand years, and its monuments. As a city of music, its street performances and international lyric festival, "Les Chorégies", appeal to music lovers.

Must-sees: The Théâtre Antique - Arc de Triomphe - Colline Saint-Eutrope - Musée d'Art et d'Histoire - Notre Dame de Nazareth Cathedral

Summer residence of the Avignon popes, Châteauneuf-du-Pape still preserves the remains of its château des papes. Situated along the Rhone River, its architectural heritage bears witness to its history as a fortified village and Roman holiday resort.
Châteauneuf-du-Pape, recognized as a Remarkable Taste Site in 2006 and France's 1st A.O.C. since 1936, is also a charming village of 2,100 inhabitants situated on a rocky hillside.

Must-sees: Château des Papes - Chocolaterie Castelain - Distillerie Blachère - Musée Brotte - Vinadéa

France's oldest Neolithic site, dating from the 6th millennium BC, was discovered in the commune of Courthézon. Around the ancient Roman Castrum, the village grew over time, protected by powerful 12th-century ramparts. Famous for its troubadours and its courts of love, Courthézon belonged to the Principality of Orange until its incorporation into the Kingdom of France on May 29, 1731, its destiny beating to the rhythm of the turbulent history of its Princes. The quarrying of Saint Georges stone, the extraction of salt for food preservation and the production of sorghum brooms made Courthézon famous. Today, Courthézon enjoys the reputation of its Côtes du Rhône vineyards and its Châteauneuf du Pape appellation.

Must-sees: The Chateau and Val Seille park - The salt pond - Le Cellier des Princes

Today, a village of 2,700 inhabitants, Caderousse "Cadarossa" takes its name from two ancient roots, Cad (the waterfall) and Arous (former name of the river Aygues), meaning the confluence of the Aygues with the Rhône. Caderousse came under the authority of the Holy Roman Emperor, then of the Comtat Venaissin, and was converted into a duchy by papal bull in 1665. It remained loyal to the papacy, and was a place of refuge for the Catholic Church of Orange during the Wars of Religion.
The village is nestled in a powerful 19th-century dike that protects it from the overflowing Rhone. The river, sometimes feared but also a friend and nurturer, has set the pace for Caderousse's life and economy. The "caderoussiens" have exploited the fertile alluvial soils and fish-filled waters, and prospered in the craft of broom-making using millet straw.

Must-sees: The dike - Saint Michel church - Via Rhona - Revestidou lake

According to tradition, the commune of Jonquières takes its name from the rushes that used to cover the area, which was largely made up of swamps or paluds that have now dried up. Settlements are thought to have developed in the south-east of the area, and archaeological digs have uncovered Gallo-Roman tombs and other Gallic material.

In the 12th c., Jonquières, Courthézon and Orange formed part of a principality that also included the hamlets of Causans and Malijay. The princes of Les Baux, Chalons d'Arvay and Nassau succeeded each other at the head of the principality until it became part of France in 1731. Jonquières followed in the footsteps of its prestigious princes. The town had its own town council and enjoyed certain privileges. It was caught up in the conflict of the Wars of Religion. The houses nestling around the church and its bell tower bear witness to the 17th century ramparts, behind which the population protected itself from wars and epidemics. Watered to the east by the Ouvèze river and the Carpentras canal, its fertile soils are ideal for growing vegetables, fruit and vines.

In 2018, work began on a greenway created on the route of the old Comtat Venaissin railroad. This Via Venaissia cycle route will eventually link the Via Rhôna (European route linking Lake Geneva to the Mediterranean Sea, EV17) to the Luberon greenway (route de la Méditerranéen Euro Véloroute no. 8).

Must-see: Via Venaissia - Arboretum

Musée du Vin - Maison Brotte

Musée du Vin - Maison Brotte

Avenue Pierre de Luxembourg
84230 Châteauneuf-du-Pape
Dogs accepted Air conditioning Parking English German Chinese Portuguese Russian
Popes' Castle

Popes' Castle

Popes' Castle
route d'Orange
84230 Châteauneuf-du-Pape
Dogs accepted
La Borne Territoriale

La Borne Territoriale

Place de la Renaissance
84230 Châteauneuf-du-Pape
Etang Salé de Courthézon

Etang Salé de Courthézon

Route de Châteauneuf du Pape
D92
84350 Courthézon
Dogs accepted Parking
Val Seille Park and Castle

Val Seille Park and Castle

1 Boulevard Jean Vilar
BP 14
84350 Courthézon
Wi-Fi Parking
Beauregard Departmental Arboretum

Beauregard Departmental Arboretum

RD 950 and RD 977 traffic circle
Beauregard district
84150 Jonquières
Dogs accepted Parking
Théâtre Antique d'Orange

Théâtre Antique d'Orange

Rue Madeleine Roch
84100 Orange
Dogs accepted English German Spanish Italian
Notre-Dame-de-Nazareth Cathedral

Notre-Dame-de-Nazareth Cathedral

Rue Notre Dame
84100 Orange
Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

Avenue de l'Arc de Triomphe
84100 Orange
Dogs accepted English
Gabet chapel

Gabet chapel

La Plane district
84100 Orange
Colline Saint Eutrope

Colline Saint Eutrope

Colline Saint Eutrope
84100 Orange
Dogs accepted Parking
Museum of Art and History

Museum of Art and History

Rue Madeleine Roch
84100 Orange
English German

Nearby tourist attractions

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Images of the Pays d'Orange en Provence

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